search 2013 adfgs

Posts Tagged resolution

Mandelbulb’s Green City

I guess I’m getting the hang of it. Warning: this is HUGE (3072 X 2304 pixels originally) but it was needed to keep up all the details, as with most fractal images the bigger they are rendered the better they look. You can see building complexes, airport tracks, green fields, playgrounds, penthouses, bridges… the whole thing but humans and dogs. I am now going to look for more coloring maps…

The watermark was hard to be placed, there wasn’t any part of this image that I wanted to be covered because in everywhere there’s a different detail to be seen, so I tried to find the least obtrusive place in the image as possible, I tried a few different positions and a few more watermarks but all the places had something that I didn’t want to be covered.

Please be kind and don’t use this image elsewhere without permission (asking first doesn’t hurt!) neither crop the watermark or replace it with your own. As I said in some old post, there’s no point in adding restrictions for preventing the download of images (or the plain old stealing) like that, and a watermark is the most useful method.

The image was compressed to reduce its final size (it was over 20Mb in .BMP) and also to prevent unauthorized reproductions with good quality, but you still can enjoy it as is. If you want an uncompressed version for any reason, “ask and you shall receive”. I’m not sure because I’m not familiarized with the Mandelbulb software but I think this is the biggest image size that is available for rendering, neither I don’t know if when it’s rendered in JPEG if it’s already compresed in some degree, I just rendered it in BMP and reconverted to JPEG. I’ll have to render an image with some more solid blocks (mostly in red) to see if there’s any compression, large solid red blocks seem to be more useful to show the JPEG compression artifacts.

The file size of the bigger image is about 2.5 Mb. Click the thumbnail to get the bigger version and use some viewing software where you can travel all over the city so you don’t miss any of the details.

Mandelbulb's Green City

Mandelbulb's Green City

Related Images:

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fractal Gallery 36

Again it’s mostly the old-school images. Most of them where done with the Orgform formula collection, some were done with the fract_ml (I guess) collection which is a collection of formulas used in images submitted to the Fractint mailing list from what I could get.

I refused to try any enhancements on them using UltraFractal this time (but it doesn’t mean I won’t rework some of these images), and I’ve used UF just to render them in bigger sizes and to make them smoother because of the colour number limitations of Fractint, as usual.

There are some images that just don’t work, or it’s because of a certain parameter used in Fractint isn’t available in UF (like the “one” and some others like “cosxx”, usually replacing them with “cos” works) or because some of Fractint’s native colouring methods don’t work that well in UF (like the epsiloncross, and sometimes just replacing the outside/inside with the UF equivalent doesn’t work). Sometimes it’s just a matter of a small tweak, sometimes it doesn’t work at all no matter what you do.

Some images are entirely different when rendered in UF and are missing most of its main”theme” parts when they really don’t work, so I’ve decided to render these that can’t be fixed at all using Fractint. They had to be rendered in GIF, 256 colours, using disk render and 1600 x 1200 resolutions and later converted to JPEG. Unfortunately, if the original image had some imperfections like bandings, these can’t be fixed, but I guess most of them look fine as they are. Some of these imperfections even make them look more authentic and “vintage”.

I’ve named them using sort of a template, something like “OF-XX” where “OF” means “Orgform” and XX is the number of the image, or “OS-XX”, “OS” meaning “old school”. In specific images, I’ve used the “regular” naming, if they were really asking for a name. But as they are mostly abstract images, the template method works.

Enough talking, here we go:

PS. I didn’t edit the tags and details of these images yet, will do that later.

Related Images:

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

About the images, pt. VII

With the new layout I’m trying also some new thumbnail settings for the galleries. Now the thumbnails are set to 90 x 90 pixels (maximum) and are not taking into consideration the original proportion of the image, so some of these might look a bit strange. The galleries can have a custom number of columns, so the size of the thumbnails isn’t exactly a problem but I still have to find what’s the best combination with the 4-columns gallery layout. Also available are some different templates for the galleries, and some really don’t fit well with any theme and others seem to not have any noticeable changes. Another change was the number of images related to the post that are displayed in the small “footer” of the posts, now there are 10 images displayed. Clicking these will open the image(s) individually, not its gallery.

Related Images:

Tags: , , , , , ,

About the images, part VI

There are less general comments to make about the images every day, but there are some points still not mentioned yet.

Most of these images were made much before than the now common 16:9 format became the default size (I guess it’s the default now, at least for LCD screens, isn’t it?). UltraFractal’s default size when you just install it and opens the default image is a 400 x 300 px image (or was, at least), in the standard (and already old?) 4:3 format. It was the common size used for ages, with all these very known sizes like 320 x 240, 640 x 480, 800 x 600 and 1024 x 768.

Read the rest of this entry »

Related Images:

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Mundo Fractal is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache