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Posts Tagged digital art

A new Mandelbulb – Almost Japanese

A nice one. I’m still not familiar with the tricks of this stuff but when it works it makes some amazing images. This one is called “Almost Japanese”. It’s worth a post of its own instead of being buried inside a gallery that not everyone will see.

made with Mandelbulb 3D

Almost Japanese

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Strange coincidence? I’m not sure what to say…

Someone recently asked me if I sell prints of my image, and while doing a search for new places to print the images, I was browsing the art.com “abstract” category. Then just after a few clicks I found this image (click the link as I can’t post the image here)…

… which immediately reminded me of this image from one of my galleries.

Yes, the “woman” is different, but at the same time it’s very similar… mine is sort of “inspired” accidentally by the Abaporu anyway so…

PS.: why is this post being hit by spammers like crazy? 20 a day. Get out.

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2 more!

While watching the stats for the last year, I noticed there were much less posts than I wanted or could have made. This will change. Here are 2 more images from the all-formula project. All the images are named after the formula that originated the fractal, and I will be telling when the formula is from a new formula collection if needed, maybe not. I guess letting too many guesses about how they are made makes the game not as funny. Click the image to see them larger as usual.

Chaosbrot Mandelbrot

Chaosbrot Mandelbrot

Hyperbon

Hyperbon

 

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Mandalas Gallery 01

Sorry for the long time without any posts but this is not a daily job, is it? OK, enough rantings.

As I said in the previous post I tried the Mandala Project or something. I opened all my UPRs one by one (well not all yet) and applied a kaleidoscope transformation on each layer to create the mandala-like images. Some images work better than others, some images don’t work at all, some give birth to a lot of new images and so on.

For the creation process, I didn’t change any of the original image’s fractal parameters, I just applied the kaleidoscope on the layers and that was it. In very few cases, I did some extra zooming when I thought I could find something more interesting a little deeper, but this wasn’t the case with all images. Of course, lots of panning work was a must to find good images, but there are some images that are just the original image with the transformation without any panning, applied to the image with its original coordinates. Also, I made the “mandalas” in the same order as I made the original images, I started with my very first (saved) image, and went on from there. I’m not sure where I am at this point now (I have about 50 images already made), but I think I’ve tried at least a whole year of images or maybe half a year of UPRs. And this is… still 2002? I think so.

For me, it’s a bit easier to spot the original image that was transformed, but sometimes there aren’t much hints and the new image is a bit different, although it still can be recognizable maybe from its colour scheme. Some “mandalas” kept some parts (or visual characteristics) of the original images a bit intact, like mandelbrot shapes, etc. etc. and this was done on purpose sometimes.

This project is something I’m doing just for fun, while I don’t have enough new images to be added to new fractal galleries.

Here are the first gallery, with 15 images (I guess 16 will look better… maybe I’ll change that):

As some people with some a good attention span might have noticed, the watermark now shows “www.mundofractal.com”. I could grab this domain name and now you can use both the .net or the .com extensions. Hopefully Google won’t get pissed at me for redirecting a domain to this URL.

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Mandalas, maybe

I read something about mandalas this week (Jung studied them, never heard of that before) and was wondering if I should make some. I am not an expert about them, have no idea about their meanings or if there are particular styles of mandalas, I am just doing something for fun. I’m not very fond of them, but not because they aren’t visually attractive. They are, sometimes, but as it’s so easy to make one from a fractal image within UF that I am not really interested. It’s too simple, although sometimes there are some very interesting images. At the same time, it’s a bit unpredictable if a good “mandala” will appear. I’m not sure if even these images can be called mandalas, if there’s some special characteristic that makes an image to be able to be called like that, just like the fractals (self-similarity etc. etc.).

I am picking all my saved fractals and applying the “mandala” trick on them – it’s the kaleidoscope transformation of UF, applied on every layer of the image – and if something interesting appears, I’m saving the image. It’s interesting how some very good fractals don’t give me any interesting mandala, and vice-versa. I’m keeeping mostly the default settings of the transformation, but sometimes I’m changing things a little bit. Also, I’m zooming in/out as needed. At first I thought it would be cheating, as I thought of making a mandala just with what the original image could give me, but why not change the rules a bit? Rules? Which rules?

Again, as soon as there are enough images for a gallery, they will be posted all at once, about 16 or 20 at a time. Maybe in a special section, who knows.

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